Civility

Try it where you live.

It is useful to remember that civility is an important part of effective civics and politics.

We can benefit by learning:

  • more of civility.
  • some collaborative leadership.
  • about consensus building.
  • a deeper level of tolerance.
  • about sources of conflict.
  • how people who are fundamentally different from one another can develop sensitivities that will enable them to get along.

We are at our best when we:

    • are listening.
    • are working in partnership with others.
    • lead by example.
    • have the courage to be appropriately humble.

Learn, educate yourself, find out what others have to say, organize, plan.

We have a lot to learn. My old aunt said that by beginning we are half way there. After that, one keeps on keeping on.

by Richard Sheehan

for Mago Bill

Mago Bill Way of Dialogue

You will begin to learn about Mago Bill as I learn to get this blog working. Here at the blog we have learned of certain interests of ours. High among those interests is a certain kind of dialogue practice and we find we have a lot to say it. Below you can find some of that which our dialogue practice is an about about what is not.

Dialogue practice is not:

~ a place to make a particular point prevail.

~ a debate or discussion.

~ an attempt to make points.

~ a game to win or lose.

Our dialogue practice is a way:

~ to peace and good-will.

~ for us to see our words as gifts.

~ to keep a stream of meaning flowing among us.

~ to an activity which helps us to be us.

~ through the meaning of word.

~ to an honest, supportive activity.

~ to greater awareness and enhanced consciousness.

~ to hone our listening skills.

~ to develop new speaking skills,

~ to practice effective methods of communication.

~ to cultural preservation, growth, and creativity.

~ of making a healthy, effective society more probable.

~ to meet interesting people.

~ of putting honest thoughts on the table where we can look at them and begin to find their meaning.

~ to practice a “second” language.

~ of being heard.

~ of finding pleasure in speaking up.

~ to understanding among us and within us.

~ to satisfying relationship.

~ to exchange idea and opinion.

~ to share experience.

~ to more effective communication outside the group.

According to David Bohm, dialogue practice is:

~ participating in a flow of meaning between us, through us, and among us.

~ an activity out of which emerges new and renewed understanding.

~ an activity which helps us to be an us.

by Richard Sheehan
for Mago Bill

by Richard Sheehan

for Mago Bill and you